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  • Opposition supporters react while listening to the results of the nationwide election for new governors, at the campaign headquarters of the Venezuelan coalition of opposition parties (MUD) in Caracas, Venezuela October 15, 2017.

    Opposition supporters react while listening to the results of the nationwide election for new governors, at the campaign headquarters of the Venezuelan coalition of opposition parties (MUD) in Caracas, Venezuela October 15, 2017. | Photo: Reuters

Some local right-wing leaders are even spatting with external supporters of Venezuela's famously fragmented opposition.

Following the Oct. 15 regional election vote that saw Nicolas Maduro's Socialists win 18 of the country's 23 states, Venezuela's opposition and their allies are quarreling among themselves over approaches and responses to the results.

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While some sections of the opposition are alleging fraud, some opposition candidates - including those who failed to win their posts - have recognized the defeat.

"I can only recognize what I have in my hands, and in Tachira, I recognize that the people spoke," Leidy Gomez, the candidate for the opposition MUD coalition who won the elections for governor of the border state, told teleSUR.

Henri Falcon, a former Chavista and long-time governor of the state of Lara who became a vocal critic of Chavez and Maduro, recognized the result of Sunday's vote as "tragic."

"Responsibly I say, we lost, it is that simple and that we have to accept it," Falcon said.

Alejandro Feo La Cruz, a MUD candidate who lost in the state of Carabobo, also acknowledged the victory of the United Socialist Party of Venezuela (PSUV) and its candidate, Rafael Lacava.

"I tell Lacava, you are the governor, so fulfill everything you promised because we will be watching you," said the candidate of Leopoldo Lopez's Popular Will party.

Meanwhile, some local right-wing  leaders are even spatting with external supporters of Venezuela's famously fragmented opposition.

Leader of the Democratic Action party Henry Ramos Allup, shot back at the head of the Organization of American States (OAS) Luis Almagro, after Almagro said participating in the election meant becoming "party to fraud."

"Look, Almagro shouldn't be  giving us so many lessons from the outside because we are here," Ramos Allup told journalist Vladimir Villegas. "We are fighting the fight here."

According to Ramos Allup, the opposition lost because of abstention - despite the increase in turnout of over 10 points compared to the 2012 regional elections.

Among the ranks of the opposition umbrella, there has been considerable discord about whether to accept the results, even for those who won their seats. The governors are required to be sworn in by the Constituent Assembly elected on July 30, and some opposition leaders are adament about not recognizing this body.

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For Ramos Allup, whose party is considered to be the biggest winner from the opposition after Sunday's vote, it is up to the individuals elected to decide whether they will attend the swearing in or not.

"The (elected) governors who are from (Democratic Action), they have to make the decision," the veteran of the Venezuelan political scene said.

 

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