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    Honduras' former President Manuel Zelaya covers his mouth to protect himself from smoke during a protest against the re-election of Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez in Tegucigalpa, Honduras January 21, 2018 | Photo: Reuters

Published 22 January 2018

“People have to continue in permanent mobilizationation in an operation that I call bees for the women, and wasps for men", says Zelaya.

The Opposition Alliance Against the Dictatorship in Honduras is pushing for more protests tomorrow in the capital city of Tegucigalpa in #OperaciónAVISPA (#OperationWASP).

RELATED: 
60 Year Old Man Killed by Military During Honduran Protests

Manuel Zelaya, secretary general of the Opposition Alliance tells the press, “People have to continue in permanent mobilization action in an operation that I call bees for the women, and wasps for men. This means that each has to sting where they are - sting here, sting there, come back, withdrawal strategically and go everywhere,” he advised.

Tomorrow’s protest is part of the Alliance’s strategy to focus its weeklong nationwide protest and general strike that began on Saturday and is running up to the swearing in of president-elect Juan Orlando Hernandez on Jan. 27.  

"These mobilizations are ours. It’s our constitutional right to protest the (electoral) fraud, and they should continue at the national level and culminate in the national strike on the 27th”, tweeted Zelaya.

The Opposition Alliance alleges that the Nov. 26 Honduran presidential election was a fraud. The Opposition candidate, Salvador Nasralla, says the Supreme Electoral Tribunal (TSE) “stole” the elections from him on behalf of Hernandez and refuse to acknowledge that the incumbent was announced the official winner Dec. 17.

Election observers from the Organization of American States (OAS) and European Union say the election and counting process were laced with so many “irregularities” that it was impossible to determine a winner. As late as Dec. 27 the OAS secretary general was calling for a clean, fresh elections.

“In defense of the Alianza triumph and Salvador Nasralla, the whole country will mobilize and strike,” Zelaya said today in a tweet.

Since protests started up this week at least one person was killed by military forces and another severely injured, according to the non-government organization, Committee of the Families of Detained and Disappeared of Honduras (COFADEH).

COFADEH reports that since major protests began in late November, at least 31 people have been killed protesting the election results and another 232 injured - mainly at the hands of the military and national police.

The organization also says that 1,085 people were victims of "cruel, inhumane and degrading" behavior by state authorities.

Despite Almagro’s previous support of holding new elections to determine a Honduran president, today the leader of the OAS announced he will “work with all elected Honduran authorities at all levels and branches of government … to strengthen institutions and electoral reforms that enable the democratic (and) just democracy.”

Hernandez, whose first term which began in 2013, has been marked by accusations of corruption and crimes since he took office.

His election campaign was fraught with corruption and embezzlement as Hernandez and his party reportedly siphoned off US$90 million from the Honduran Social Security Institute to pay for his campaign. His administration has also been accused of orchestrating the assassination of several human rights activists in Honduras in the past four years.


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terrible... hopefully they will get rid of that soon
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