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  • The EU has been mostly quiet about the developments in Spain.

    The EU has been mostly quiet about the developments in Spain. | Photo: European Parliament

The EU had no plans to discuss the crisis, but an emergency meeting was called by the European United Left–Nordic Green Left.

The European Parliament has decided to include a debate on Catalonia on its agenda this week since backing Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy after the bloody repression the Spanish government carried out during Sunday's independence referendum.

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The EU had no plans to discuss the crisis, but an emergency meeting was called by the European United Left–Nordic Green Left and was accepted by the majority after a consensus that the issue in question is the “fundamental rights” according to Spanish law for its citizens.

Entitled, “'Violence of the police against peaceful citizens in Catalonia,” European parliamentarians will be obliged to address the violence perpetrated by the Spanish state.

"We can not turn a blind eye to the police violence we saw yesterday in Catalonia. Violence is not the solution. We need dialogue because it is the only way out,” said German MEP and co-chair of the Green group, Ska Keller.

Sunday’s police repression amounted to almost 850 injuries and at least one sexual abuse case. Catalonia’s top envoy to the European Union, Amadeu Altafaj, denounced the inaction of the European Union, saying that a generic discussion on the use of excessive force will not aid Catalonia and is damaging to the union’s credibility.

"Speaking about violence in general but not specifying what kind of violence and who is mainly responsible for this violence and drawing political conclusions from it, is disappointing," Altafaj told reporters.

"The message has to be clear that we want the Commission to offer a mediation. The message also needs to be that this is a political conflict that can only be solved by political means," Keller added.

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"I would like you to be aware that the subject we are talking about is very serious and that we do not have to treat it in a superficial way,” Spain’s representative Esteban Gonzalez Pons, a member of the ruling People’s Party, said to his colleagues and fellow parliamentarians Monday.

Five MEP’s wrote a written request for the EU Parliament’s President Jean-Claude Juncker and Vice President Frans Timmerman to diplomatically mediate the issue and denounce the Spanish government’s “breach of the Union’s fundamental values” according to Article 7 of the EU Treaty.

This section of the treaty which took effect in 1999 is supposed to protect the liberty, democracy, and respect for rights and fundamental freedoms.


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