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  • People gather at a makeshift memorial for the victims of the Belgium attacks in Brussels, at Union Square in the Manhattan borough in New York, March 22, 2016.
    In Depth

    People gather at a makeshift memorial for the victims of the Belgium attacks in Brussels, at Union Square in the Manhattan borough in New York, March 22, 2016.

Over the years terrorist attacks and a growing refugee crisis at Europe’s border is bringing to light the fascist and right-wing backlash.

Two coordinated terrorist attacks in Brussels, Belgium, left the world in shock on Tuesday morning, as reports say over 31 people were killed and more than 200 injured so far.

Nevertheless voices have raised to warn against the potential devastating effects of a discourse based on emotions and anger, prompt to turn into a generalized anti-Muslim feeling.

The conflation of terrorism with a single religion practiced by 1.6 billion people worldwide has increased anti-Muslim sentiment across the globe.

In the context of the rise of neo-fascism in Europe and the humanitarian crisis of refugees, reflection over the causes and effects of terror, both state and nonstate, is more needed than ever.

If You Read Just One Thing…

People gather around a memorial in Brussels following bomb attacks in Brussels, Belgium.

Blame Hate, Not Islam: Europe's Left Responds to Terror Attacks

By Naomi Cohen

Grassroots groups across Europe are warning against succumbing to misguided and bigoted speech in the wake of terrorism. READ MORE

The Larger Picture: How Terrorism Feeds Islamophobia

Pasted signs reading

Since the beginning of the rise of ISIS, or Islamic State, the danger of an increase in anti-Muslim racism has become an unfortunate reality in the Western world. A number of political forces - not exclusively in the extreme right - are spreading Islamophobia day in and day out through utterly ridiculous attempts to equalize ISIS and Islam. READ MORE.

The Rise of Fascism in Europe

Ultra right-wing Golden Dawn party supporters demonstrate against the presence of migrants without papers in Greece, during the World Day against Racism, Athens, March 21, 2015.

Interview: Golden Dawn and the Revival of European Fascism

By Georgia Platman

Five years after the NATO-led Western intervention in Libya and the ousting of the country’s leader Muammar Gadhafi, the refugee situation in Europe has become one of the most troubling consequences of the 2011 turmoil. Yet in order to solve the crisis, Europe continues to implement faulty policies that have proven both unsustainable and unethical. READ MORE.

The Return of European Fascism 

By Lee Brown

teleSUR speaks to Sabby Dhalu, co-secretary of U.K.-based Unite Against Fascism, about the rise of fascism in Europe.  READ MORE.

Refugees Pay the Price

A man inspects a site that contained a drinking water well, damaged by an airstrike

Don't Make Refugees Pay for the Terror They Flee

Closing borders and blaming Muslim immigrants for the Paris attacks would give ISIS the “civilizational conflict” it craves. READ MORE

Paris Attacks Fallout:

Over one year ago, armed militants killed 12 people at the Paris headquarters of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo that had regularly mocked religion. And in November, the Islamic State group claimed responsibility for a series of coordinated attacks in Paris that killed over 130 people.

Although both attacks were eventually claimed by jihadi terror groups, entire Muslim populations were cast as perpetrators as soon as the news broke. The conflation of terrorism with a single religion practiced by 1.6 billion people worldwide has increased anti-Muslim sentiment across the globe.

Beirut and Paris: A Tale of Two Terror Attacks

Presidential sympathy had been conspicuously absent the previous day when terror attacks in Beirut left more than 40 dead. Predictably, Western media and social media were much less vocal about the slaughter in Lebanon. READ MORE


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