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  • A refugee prays on a hill overlooking Kutupalong camp after another Rohingya burial.

    A refugee prays on a hill overlooking Kutupalong camp after another Rohingya burial. | Photo: UNHCR

The refugee camps in Bangladesh are overflowing and many are forced to live in informal settlements, according to UNHCR.

The United Nations has called for "massive international assistance" to aid with the ongoing Rohingya influx in Bangladesh. So far nearly 436,000 from the stateless Muslim minority have fled to the country from Myanmar.

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The refugee camps in Bangladesh are overflowing and many are forced to live in informal settlements, the U.N. refugee agency UNHCR reported.

The U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, Filippo Grandi called the crisis, "fastest and most urgent refugee emergency in the world" and said, "People have fled unspeakable violence, and their needs are enormous," after visiting the refugee camp Kutupalong.

"International support is also now being stepped up, under the leadership of the government. But these efforts must be accelerated and sustained," he added.

UNICEF said that 100 tons of humanitarian aid from Europe including water purifying tablets, tarpaulins, sanitary items have reached Bangladesh.

India has also sent 700 tons of aid such as food, clothes and mosquito nets which is expected to help at least 62,000 families.

Bangladesh's Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has described the persecution of the Rohingya as "ethnic cleansing."

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In her address to the U.N. General Assembly in New York, on Thursday, she said, “I have come here just after seeing the hungry, distressed and hopeless Rohingya from Myanmar who took shelter in Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh.”

"They are fleeing 'ethnic cleansing' in their own country where they have been living for centuries."

Bangladesh currently shelters over 800,000 Rohingya. However, only some 300,000 Rohingya who arrived before the recent outbreak of violence are considered as refugees. Those who have fled after the conflict are considered "undocumented."

In her U.N. address, Hasina proposed a five-point plan to resolve the crisis, including creating "safe zones" in Myanmar to be supervised by the U.N.

"Myanmar must stop the violence and the practice of ethnic cleansing in the Rakhine State unconditionally, immediately and forever," she said.

"The U.N. secretary-general should immediately send a fact-finding mission to Myanmar; all civilians, irrespective of religion and ethnicity, must be protected in Myanmar."

Amid the ongoing chaos, citing security concerns, Bangladesh has barred the local telecommunication companies from selling mobile phone connections to the Muslim minority that recently entered the country.

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