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  • Well-wishers greet Bolivia

    Well-wishers greet Bolivia's President Evo Morales. | Photo: @evoespueblo

The country's first Indigenous head of state also called into question the racist motives behind the U.S. government's continued plan to build a wall on the Mexican border.

“Trump's withdrawal from the Paris Accord demonstrates that he's more concerned with continuing his xenophobic, racist policies than defending Mother Earth,” Bolivian President Evo Morales tweeted Wednesday.

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The country's first Indigenous head of state also called into question the racist motives behind the U.S. government's continued plan to build a wall on the Mexican border.

Morales emphasized that while Trump threatened to shut down the federal government if it doesn't agree to build the U.S.-Mexico wall Tuesday, international diplomats such as the head of the Organization of American States Luis Almagro and other “defenders of democracy” turn a blind eye to these grave affronts on human rights.

More people have died crossing the border from Mexico to enter the United States in the first seven months of 2017 compared to the year before, even as crossings appear to have dropped sharply, according to the United Nations migration agency, the International Organization of Migration.

The U.N. migration agency counted 232 migrant deaths through the end of July, a 17 percent jump from a year earlier, which totaled 204 deaths. July saw the highest number of deaths of any month this year, with 50 bodies discovered, including 10 discovered in a sweltering truck parked outside a Walmart in San Antonio, Texas.

Thousands have died crossing the border since the mid-1990s, when heightened enforcement in San Diego, Calif. and El Paso, Texas pushed traffic into Arizona’s remote, scorching deserts.

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Once known as one of most underdeveloped nations in the region, Bolivia is now a leader in terms of its domestic economy and has drastically improved its education, health care and social security systems. Since Morales took office in 2006, the country has restructured its socio-political agenda, which included nationalizing its natural resources and liberating itself from foreign magnates.

Earlier this year, Morales stressed that Bolivia had achieved complete independence from the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, which for many years dictated the economic destiny of the country.


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