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  • Virginia Shaka during demonstrations while President Donald Trump delivered a speech on tax reform in Indianapolis, in September.

    Virginia Shaka during demonstrations while President Donald Trump delivered a speech on tax reform in Indianapolis, in September. | Photo: Reuters

Published 26 November 2017

"On Monday, November 27, our whole national network will be showing up together to say that the #TrumpTaxScam would hurt our friends, our families and our country..."

Ahead of the National Day of Action on Nov.27, multiple tax reform advocacy groups are gearing up and will also hold sit-ins protesting Trump's " tax scam." Groups held protests against Trump's tax plan that unevenly favors the wealthy and imposes additional burdens on middle and lower income groups. 

RELATED:
This Is How GOP Tax Plan Is Taking from Lower Income Groups and Feeding Wealthy

"For weeks, Indivisible groups have been showing up at congressional offices around the country to say no to the #TrumpTaxScam," they said on their website. 

Further adding,  "On Monday, November 27, our whole national network will be showing up together to say that the #TrumpTaxScam would hurt our friends, our families and our country—and we’re not letting that happen without a fight." 

"Trump's tax plan is a boon for corporations and the wealthy. And a bust for families. Put simply, this plan is a scam," the website stated, adding, "Republicans have made it crystal clear: the Trump Tax Scam fight and the TrumpCare fight are one and the same," the website resisting Trump's tax plan read.

The advocacy group also noted that Trump's "tax scam" would further divide the country along the race lines. 

"The Trump Tax Scam makes existing racial inequality even worse. The majority of the benefits of the Trump Tax Scam flow to the top 1%—a slice of the population that is 82% white but only 3% Black and 5% Latino," the website stated.  

Trump on Sunday also reaffirmed his support for the "accused child molester" Roy Moore, over Democrat Doug Jones as a GOP Senate nominee. Jones is best known for a 1963 case where he prosecuted two Ku Klux Klansmen who bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham in 1963, killing four girls in the process. 

The U.S. president also called Jones "bad" for taxes and gun rights among other issues. 

"The last thing we need in Alabama and the U.S. Senate is a Schumer/Pelosi puppet who is WEAK on Crime, WEAK on the Border, Bad for our Military and our great Vets, Bad for our 2nd Amendment, AND WANTS TO RAISES TAXES TO THE SKY. Jones would be a disaster!" Trump said in a tweet. 

The decision has also caused a rift within the Republican party as many Republicans have openly condemned Trump's choice. South Carolina senator, Lindsay Graham, told CNN during the State of the Union address, called Trump's decision, "political" when asked if Trump was right in choosing Moore. 

"That’s a political decision by the president," he said. "From a Republican point of view, I don’t see what winning looks like with Roy Moore." 

Adding, "If he wins, we get the baggage of him winning and it becomes a story every day about whether or not you believe the women or believe Roy Moore, should he stay in the Senate or should he be expelled. If you lose, you give the Senate seat to a Democrat at a time when we need all the seats we can get." }

A new report by 'Americans for Tax Fairness,' campaign that came out last week also listed  "terrible" ways in which the GOP tax plan systematically puts the burden of taxes on middle and lower income groups and offers unwarranted tax cuts to the wealthy. 

"Half of all households—94 million—would pay more in taxes in 10 years. Of those, 82 million are of low- or middle-income. Two-thirds of families earning $55,000 to $93,000 will see a tax increase, " according to the report. 

Among a series of cuts that clearly benefit the upper crust of the U.S. population, one that stands out is the possible cuts worth US$ 136 billion from mandatory spending in 2018 fiscal year which includes US$25 billion in Medicare cuts, if Congress is unable to find ways to offset its increasing deficits, the Congressional Budget Office, CBO noted.

Some of other benefits are at risk of being completely wiped out, like the agricultural subsidies, some health funds linked to the Affordable Care Act, Customs and Border Patrol operations and funds in the Student Loan Administration, per a budgetary watchdog group,  the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, the Hill reported. 


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