• Live
    • Audio Only
  • Share on Google +
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on twitter
  • Police secure the area after an explosion in Ansbach, Germany, July 25, 2016.

    Police secure the area after an explosion in Ansbach, Germany, July 25, 2016. | Photo: Reuters

The Syrian who blew himself up at a concert in Bavaria had pledged his allegiance to the Islamic State group on a video found on his mobile phone.

The Syrian who blew himself up at a concert in southern Germany Sunday had pledged his allegiance to the Islamic State group on a video found on his mobile phone, Bavarian Interior Minister Joachim Herrmann said on Monday.

"A provisional translation by an interpreter shows that he expressly announces, in the name of Allah, and testifying his allegiance to (Islamic State group leader) Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi ... an act of revenge against the Germans because they're getting in the way of Islam," Joachim Herrmann said at a news conference.

OPINION:
The Muslim Enemy: Hating Islam Is Good Politics in Europe

"I think that after this video there's no doubt that the attack was a terrorist attack with an Islamist background."

The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack, according to Amaq, a news agency that supports the extreme Takfiri Islamist group.

Fifteen people were injured in the attack Sunday in the Bavarian city of Ansbach. It was the fourth violent episode in Germany in a week. Last Monday, a 17-year-old Afghan refugee wounded four passengers on a train in Würzburg using an ax; on Friday, a mentally disturbed 18-year-old Iranian-German gunned down nine people in Munich before killing himself; and earlier on Sunday, a 21-year-old Syrian refugee killed a woman with a machete in Reutlingen, in the southwestern state of Baden-Württemberg.

Three of the attacks involved recent emigres, and three occurred in the southern state of Bavaria, which has been an entry point for many of the million migrants who have sought refuge in Germany since the start of last year. Ansbach Mayor Carda Seidel said the city´s population is roughly 50,000, of which 644 are refugees, noting that the bomber had received two deportation orders, most recently on July 13.

RELATED:
How Europe Created Its Own Refugee Crisis

“Bavaria is experiencing days of terror,” the state’s premier, Horst Seehofer, wrote on Facebook on Monday. “Our thoughts are with those injured by the insidious and brutal bombing in Ansbach.”

He added: “The constitutional state will not retreat. Prudent in enlightenment, but determined in action — this is our guiding principle. The safety of our citizens is the highest priority.”

The blast in Ansbach occurred late Sunday at a bar outside the entrance to the music festival, which was attended by nearly 2,000 people.

The man had entered Germany last year after passing through Bulgaria, where he was fingerprinted, and he had been denied asylum in Germany.

As a policy, Germany does not send Syrians who are denied asylum back to Syria, on account of the civil war there, but it would have been possible to send him back to Bulgaria, his point of entry into the European Union.

“It is correct that Syrians cannot be deported to Syria at this point, this is out of the question, but that does not mean that Syrians cannot be deported at all,” Interior Ministry spokesman Tobias Plate said in Berlin on Monday. Plate also noted how the Syrian refugee who killed himself in Ansbach had been notified of his impending deportation to Bulgaria, but “I can’t at this point tell you why the deportation has not been carried out.”


Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.