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  • Protesters gather outside the National Electoral Council in Quito.

    Protesters gather outside the National Electoral Council in Quito. | Photo: teleSUR

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According to Juan Pablo Pozo, head of the CNE, three members of the Provincial Council in Guayas were attacked.

Andres Paez, the right-wing vice presidential candidate of Guillermo Lasso, led a protest that turned violent, as supporters clashed with police officers after the presidential elections in Ecuador.

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Paez was outside the National Electoral Council, on top of a large pickup truck, surrounded by followers, mostly apparently from the upper-class CREO-SUMA alliance.

The candidate brought different people to the improvised stage, who he alleged knew about election fraud, and then called his supporters to protest on the streets and demand that the police forces who were guarding the premises allow them inside the CNE.

Paez accused the government of Rafael Correa of seeking to secure the election of Lenin Moreno, from the governing party Alianza Pais.

Lasso, a former banker who is in second place behind front-runner Moreno, also accused Correa's government of trying to manipulate the results of Sunday's election.

According to Juan Pablo Pozo, head of the CNE, three members of the Provincial Council in Guayas were attacked, after politicians called for violence and alleged fraud without any proof.

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Moreno has 39.13 percent of votes with 88 percent of ballots counted over Lasso's 28.31 percent. Moreno needs to pass the 40 percent threshold to win the presidential election in the first round.

The CNE announced Monday that Ecuadoreans should expect to wait three days for the results to be completely finalized in order to determine whether the presidential election will go to a second round on April 2.

Referring to the opposition's fraud allegations, Pozo denied any cases of fraud, adding that if it happened it would mean that they would have had "200 accomplices" since there were hundreds of independent international observers who have said the voting went smoothly and did not register any major problems.

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