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  • Dilma Rouseff was elected as Brazil

    Dilma Rouseff was elected as Brazil's first female President in 2011. | Photo: EFE

Last August, Brazil's Senate voted to remove Rouseff from office for manipulating the budget, a charge she denies.

Brazilian senators will have to review the controversial procedure that led to the former president Dilma Rousseff's impeachment last year, after an online citizens' petition gathered more than 46,000 signatures in less than 24 hours.

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The survey is being carried out on the Senate's online platform E-Cidadania, and required a minimum of 20,000 signatures by November before it could be formally converted into a “legislative suggestion” to be considered in the higher house.

It poses two questions: firstly, that the loss of her mandate as the constitutional president was the consequence of a coup d'état.

And secondly, that the 'failure' of her successor Michel Terner's government means that the only solution is to reinstate Rouseff into her elected post which should never have been taken away from her.

Last August, Brazil's Senate voted to remove her from office for manipulating the budget.

Rouseff protested her innocence and promised not to give up the political struggle against poverty and inequality.

The petition is similar to another one which has been drawn up by the National Movement for the Anullment of the Impeachment, MNAI.

It's supporters include the former president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, the national president of the Workers' Party, Gleisi Hoffmann and the singer and composer Chico Buarque.

The MNAI hopes to gather 1.3 million signatures in order to pressure the Federal Supreme Court to revoke the result of the trial against Rousseff.

The Brazilian President Michel Temer's approval ratings have plummeted to less than five percent as the corruption allegations against him and other politicians refuse to go away.

While opponents of his government's controversial labor and pension reforms are still demanding his resignation.


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