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  • Daniel Ortega, President of Nicaragua.

    Daniel Ortega, President of Nicaragua. | Photo: EFE

The U.S. claims the move threatens trade relations between the two countries.

U.S. government officials on temporary duty in Nicaragua were expelled this week, the U.S. State Department said on Thursday, without elaborating on what the officials were doing in the Central American country.

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State Department spokesman John Kirby told a news briefing that three officials had only recently arrived in Nicaragua when they were expelled on Tuesday, adding the action was "unwarranted and inconsistent with the positive and constructive agenda" it seeks with Managua.

Nicaragua's government said that in an "unfortunate incident," it removed two U.S. officials from the country who were performing Customs security work tied to anti-terrorism, without the knowledge of local officials.

It was not immediately clear why Nicaragua and the United States had different figures for the number of U.S. officials in the country.

"Such treatment has the potential to negatively impact U.S. and Nicaraguan bilateral relations, particularly trade," Kirby told reporters when asked about the incident. "We've conveyed our strong displeasure," Kirby said, referring specifically to Francisco Campbell, Nicaragua's ambassador to the United States.

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In a letter distributed to the press, Campbell said the U.S. officials' anti-terrorism activities "were carried out without the knowledge or the proper coordination with Nicaraguan authorities, which is ... very delicate and sensitive."

Nicaragua said it told the U.S. government "of the necessity to inform (them) about official missions that come to Nicaragua, and to coordinate their work."

Kirby did not say whether Nicaragua's ambassador had been summoned to the State Department or the U.S. sentiments had been conveyed in some other manner.

"We believe it was unwarranted and inconsistent with the positive and constructive agenda that we seek with the government of Nicaragua," he said of the expulsion.


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They were not up to any good. Whatsoever. Hopefully you them out in time
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