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  • A man is detained by NYPD officers as people take part in a protest against the killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, New York City, July 7, 2016.

    A man is detained by NYPD officers as people take part in a protest against the killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, New York City, July 7, 2016. | Photo: Reuters

"The conversation just turned completely weird to me. Because he’s basically telling me it’s ok to racially profile," Birch told Gawker.

Systemic racism in the U.S. police was exposed once again in the media Wednesday with a leaked audio recording a New York Police Department officer being pressured to profile Black men by his superior.

ANALYSIS:
Police Terror, Racism and the Rocky Road to US Apartheid

The conversation was recorded in August 2012 as officer Michael Birch, who leaked the video to Gawker, was going through a performance evaluation with the New York City Transit, conducted by NYPD Captain Constantin Tsachas, according to the Daily News.

"The conversation just turned completely weird to me. Because he’s basically telling me it’s ok to racially profile," Birch told Gawker.

In the audio recording, his superior is heard criticizing Birch for only arresting two Black men out of 54 people in total. “So you’re telling me you only saw two male Blacks jump the turnstile?”

Birch filed a lawsuit against the NYPD in which he claimed he was “retaliated against for being a whistleblower on an illegal quota system,” reports Raw Story. He appealed after the court dismissed the case.

Last Friday, the United Nations voiced its concerns about racism in the U.S., explicitly referring to the deaths of Philando Castile in Minnesota and Alton Sterling in Louisiana at the hands of police officers earlier in the week.

“The killings also demonstrate a high level of structural and institutional racism. The United States is far from recognizing the same rights for all its citizens. Existing measures to address racist crimes motivated by prejudice are insufficient and have failed to stop the killings,” Ricardo A. Sunga III, chair of the U.N. expert panel on people of African descent, said in a communique issued on the U.N. official website.

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