• Live
    • Audio Only
  • Share on Google +
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on twitter
  • Protesters march against the education reform in Mexico City.

    Protesters march against the education reform in Mexico City. | Photo: Reuters

Another teacher died Tuesday as more strikes and road blocks are planned.

Another teacher in Oaxaca died Tuesday from injuries sustained last month after he was hit in the head when police attacked protesters in Nochixtlan.

OPINION:
Mexico's Education Reform Is Being Imposed with Bloodshed

Jose Caballero Julian taught Indigenous education and was part of a group of teachers who began a national strike against the new education reform proposed by the government of Enrique Peña Nieto.

The police evicted the teachers that were striking outside the Public Education Institute of Oaxaca when Caballero was hit in the head and later hospitalized.

About 800 policemen cleared the roads blocked by more than 500 teachers in the southern state of Oaxaca. The clash lasted hours, and people were bombarded with tear gas and other crowd control munitions.

Meanwhile, the National Coordinator of Education Workers, or CNTE, teachers union announced they will continue the protests, and warned there will be more road blockades. They also blocked malls located south of Oaxaca City.

RELATED:
Mexico City Teachers Begin Indefinite General Strike

Similarly, 20 roadblocks are being held throughout the state. According to the striking teachers, there is no agreement to lift the blockades.

Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong gave an ultimatum on Friday, saying the time of the blockades had been "exhausted" and that soon they would make a decision to prevent so-called "damage" to the citizens of Oaxaca and Chiapas.

The government plans to lay off tens of thousands more teachers and has also threatened those who are attending the massive protests.

The CNTE union has approximately 200,000 members and numerous local unions and groups have joined the general strike in Tabasco, Chiapas, Guerrero and Oaxaca.

|

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.