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  • Per the public surveys, Jakobsdottir garnered a vast majority of her votes from the voters aged between 18-29, particularly women.

    Per the public surveys, Jakobsdottir garnered a vast majority of her votes from the voters aged between 18-29, particularly women. | Photo: Reuters

Published 3 December 2017

Described as "charismatic" and "trustworthy", the 41-year old will now have to lead a tricky coalition in a fragmented political landscape.

Iceland chose its second woman prime minister, Katrin Jakobsdottir of the Left-Green Movement on Thursday.

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Described as "charismatic" and "trustworthy", the 41-year old will now have to lead a tricky coalition in a fragmented political landscape, the leader also announced a pact to form a three-party coalition with the conservative Independence Party and the center-right Progressive Party. 

"It is important that we try to change the way we work together," she said as she announced the coalition. "This agreement strikes a new chord."

Jakobsdottir was born into a family of poets, prominent politicians and academics, went to the University of Iceland, later receiving her master's degree in Icelandic literature. She is married with three children. 

Referring to the 2008 financial collapse that devastated the country's economy, she said the government will focus on boosting its tourism to bring in the cash flow needed to fund programs like health and education.

"We are focusing on the broad outlines on how we can really build up the public system in Iceland which of course suffered gravely in the crisis ten years ago," she told AFP. 

Iceland has seen the rise of several anti-establishment parties in recent years with the public becoming increasingly distrustful of the elitist political interests in the country. 

Per the public surveys, Jakobsdottir garnered a vast majority of her votes from voters aged between 18-29, particularly women. 

"I think she would be a strong leader... because she has been a member of the parliament for a long time among corrupt people and still stayed true to herself," Solkatla Olafsdottirs, a 26-year-old supporter of the anti-establishment Pirates Party, said. 

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