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  • Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton

    Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton | Photo: Reuters

Some 56 percent of those surveyed said they reject the recommendation of the FBI not to file charges against Clinton.

Most U.S. citizens disagree with the decision not to bring charges against Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee and former secretary of state, according to a Washington Post and ABC survey published Monday raising questions about how the U.S. government is favoring the former first lady.

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Some 56 percent of citizens said they reject the recommendation of the FBI not to file charges against Clinton, while 35 percent approve of the decision.

Despite evidence of potential violations, FBI Director James Comey, who was appointed by President Barack Obama, ended a yearlong probe into Clinton's use of a private email server during her tenure as secretary of state, arguing there was no direct evidence that Clinton had "intended to violate laws governing the handling of classified information."

Also 57 percent of those surveyed said the issue is cause for concern about Clinton's potential presidency. The poll was taken July 6-7 with a sample of 519 adults and with a margin of error of plus or minus 5 percent.

The poll indicates that the majority of the U.S. in fact agrees with the country’s laws which is at odds with the decision by the government of President Obama, who has already endorsed Clinton for president.

U.S. criminal code relating to documents containing classified information says a crime has been committed when a government official, "knowingly removes such documents or materials without authority and with the intent to retain such documents or materials at an unauthorized location."

The FBI’s decision in favor of the former first lady comes less than a month after a leaked document from the U.S. Democratic National Committee showed how the Democratic Party had favored and worked with Clinton since she kicked off her campaign last year.

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Therefore the FBI’s decision to let Clinton off the hook for the email scandal cannot not be separated from the Democratic establishment and Obama’s deep support for her campaign.

However, observers say the email scandal is now less likely to affect her presidential bid. The poll found that 60 percent of the respondents said the scandal would not affect their vote in the November general election.

Clinton will campaign Tuesday in the state of New Hampshire with her opponent Bernie Sanders who is expected to finally give her his support, which he has declined to do so far in order to push for a progressive platform at the party’s convention later this month.

Their two campaign teams held talks in Orlando, Florida about the political platform that the party will make official at the Democratic National Convention, to be held between July 25-28 in Philadelphia.


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