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  • Women hold makeshift crosses during a march to commemorate International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, in Guatemala City.

    Women hold makeshift crosses during a march to commemorate International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, in Guatemala City. | Photo: Reuters

Published 3 January 2018

Between January and October 2017, the country's prosecution office received 10,963 reports of sexual abuse of women along with children and teenagers.

Authorities in Guatemala have created a database, which will include a list of persons charged with various sexually based crimes.

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The public prosecution office in Guatemala has created the National Record of Sexual Aggressors or RENAS, which will contain identification numbers and/or details on all persons with criminal history of sexual aggression. These records will identify past and possible sexual aggressors and prevent them from working closely with vulnerable populations.

Starting on Jan. 1, 2018, anyone intending to work with children or teenagers, including schools and day-care workers, must access an internet site and request a free-of-charge document that certifies that they have no sexual aggression criminal charge.

An activist holds a sign that reads "We are missing 43 girls! Justice!" during a protest outside Guatemala's embassy in Managua in 2016. | Photo: Reuters

“The tool will be useful for people, men or women alike, that need to work with children and teenagers, because they will need a certificate that states they're free of these kinds of records,” said Yecenia Enriquez, the prosecution office's spokesperson.

Between January and October 2017, that office received 10,963 reports of sexual abuse of women along with children and teenagers. In 2016 the number rose to 13,634.

The record began to function last Monday, with the input of 5,000 people found guilty of sexual crimes. On Monday and Tuesday, already 2,000 people had already asked for the certificates clearing them to work with vulnerable groups.

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