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  • The relative of a missing student holds a copy of the report of the Inter-American Human Rights Commission (CIDH), during a meeting with members of the CIDH at the Ayotzinapa teachers

    The relative of a missing student holds a copy of the report of the Inter-American Human Rights Commission (CIDH), during a meeting with members of the CIDH at the Ayotzinapa teachers' training college, in Tixtla, Mexico, September 8, 2015. | Photo: Reuters

The announcement was not released until the experts met the parents of Jhosivani Guerrero, the new student allegedly identified in the Ayotzinapa case. 

An Argentina forensic team has described the Mexican government's recent announcement that they had identified the remains of a second victim in the Ayotzinapa student disappearance as “weak and not definitive."

The Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team (EAAF) made the announcement on Friday after meeting with the parents of Jhosivani Guerrero, the student allegedly identified by recent tests. The announcement from the Argentina team comes two days after Mexico’s Attorney General Arely Gomez said that the remains of the second forcibly disappeared Ayotzinapa student had been identified by Austrian forensic experts.

On Friday, the Argentina team also stated that Mexican Attorney General office's version of a possible connection between the remains found in plastic bags in a river and the DNA of the student, is only a “remote possibility.”

The Argentina forensic team, which has been involved in the investigation of the Ayotzinapa disappearance, added that there are serious questions about the origin of the samples that are being analyzed by forensic experts from Innsbruck Medical University, who have already identified one missing student based on a bone fragment.

RELATED: Mexico Captures Alleged Culprit in Ayotzinapa Disappearances

The Mexican government has claimed that the students were abducted by corrupt police officers in the state of Guerrero, who handed them over to a local drug gang, killed and incinerated them and threw their remains into a river. The case was closed in December. This official version of the story was called a “historical truth.”

Earlier this month, however, a group of independent experts working under Inter-American Commission on Human Rights released a report challenging the official story. The group said the event described by authorities “never took place” and that the investigation should be refocused. Families of the victims continue to demand justice, just one week before the one-year anniversary of the disappearance.

The EAAF has provided international assistance in almost 30 countries. It was created in 1986 with the aim of developing forensic anthropology techniques to help locate and identify Argentinians who were disappeared during the military dictatorship. They also identified the remains of Ernesto "Che" Guevara.

WATCH: Imaginary Lines – Ayotzinapa Mexican Government Cover-Up?


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