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  • Keiko Fujimori during a presidential campaign rally in Peru.

    Keiko Fujimori during a presidential campaign rally in Peru. | Photo: AFP

Published 10 November 2017

Odebrecht confirmed that there was a delivery of money and that it was probably around US$500,000.

Marcelo Odebrecht, former CEO of the Brazilian construction company, admitted the firm funded the campaign of Keiko Fujimori and other candidates in Peru's 2011 presidential elections, according to El Comercio.

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Odebrecht revealed the payments to Brazilian and Peruvian prosecutors during an interrogation in Curitiba, Brazil.

The alleged connection with Fujimori is based on a message obtained from the calendar in Odebrecht's cell phone, which read in Portuguese "aumentar keiko para 500 e eu fazer visita," meaning "raise keiko to 500 and pay a visit."

Odebrecht confirmed that there was a delivery of money and that it was probably US$500,000. He said Jorge Barata, former Odebrecht representative in Peru, should be able to corroborate the amount. The businessman said that if he put the word "raise" on his calendar, he was referring to the fact that money had been previously delivered to Fujimori.

He also said the scandal-ridden company had paid former presidents Ollanta Humala and Alan Garcia, who was referred to as "AG" in his notes.

The interrogation took place at the Curitiba Federal Police, where Odebrecht is being held for corruption charges under a 19-year sentence.

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Peru: Keiko Fujimori Testifies in Odebrecht Corruption Case

Fujimori, who came in second, losing to current President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski, has said she never had contact with the official and didn't receive money for either of her presidential campaigns in 2011 and 2016.

Odebrecht said that the companies working with his firm in Peru knew what Odebrecht was doing and that his company had a policy of paying presidential candidates that had a chance of winning.

Keiko Fujimori, daughter of former dictator Alberto Fujimori, is the leader of the Popular Force, the strongest party in congress. The party spokesperson Daniel Salaverry said the allegations against her were a lie.

"We never had doubts about the honesty of Keiko Fujimori," Salaverry said. "In the next few days, they will be able to confirm that neither Keiko Fujimori nor Popular Force were involved in corruption."


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