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  • According to official statistics, 75,000 died, while approximately 8,000 were reported missing, although unofficial figures suggest 10,000.

    According to official statistics, 75,000 died, while approximately 8,000 were reported missing, although unofficial figures suggest 10,000. | Photo: EFE

The commission will begin its investigations in 2018, searching for those that are believed to have been murdered or abducted by right-wing paramilitaries or military personnel.

El Salvador's leftist government has formed a commission to investigate the disappearance of thousands of victims of the country’s civil war 25 years after its end.

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The commission will begin its investigations in 2018, searching for those that are believed to have been murdered or abducted by right-wing paramilitaries or military personnel in hopes of reuniting families with their loved ones or of delivering the remains for burial.

"In this way, we reaffirm our deep commitment to the victims of forced disappearances in the country and to ensure that this sad chapter in our history is not repeated," said Salvadoran President Salvador Sanchez Ceren to members of human rights organizations for victims’ rights.

Sanchez, from the ruling Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front, stated that the launching of the National Commission for the Search of Disappeared Adults is “another important step in the path of truth and dignity of the victims."

The FMLN led the struggle against the brutal Salvadoran government, which was backed and financed by the United States.

According to official statistics, 75,000 died while, approximately 8,000 were reported missing, however unofficial figures suggest more than 10,000 disappeared during 1980-1992.

The Committee of Relatives of Victims of Human Rights Violations has called on the military to participate in the "arduous work" of finding the thousands of missing persons.

"My call is to the military to collaborate,” said Codefam President Guadalupe Mejia, “because they were the ones who disappeared our families" and "they know where they were left off.”

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"We hope that this commission will offer something to the mothers, we only want to be told at least what they did with them," said Sofia Hernandez, who continues to look for signs of her daughter, two brothers and four nephews.

"I have faith and hope that this commission will give answers to the mothers," said Hernandez.

"Those who can recover the remains, recover them ... even a piece of bone," she said.

Last year, the Supreme Court of Justice declared unconstitutional an amnesty law from 1993 that has prevented the investigation and prosecution of those accused of war crimes in the Central American country.

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