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  • People participate in a protest against privatisation of water in San Salvador.

    People participate in a protest against privatisation of water in San Salvador. | Photo: Reuters

Published 5 July 2018

Demonstrators marched towards the Legislative Assembly where they intended to have their demands heard by a commission of different political factions.

Students and staff of the National University of El Salvador, or UES, gathered in front of the educational institution to protest against the possible privatization of drinking water in El Salvador. Students blocked a stretch of the Los Heroes Boulevard, Autopista Norte, San Antonio Abad, Tutunichapa Boulevard and 25 Av Norte.

RELATED: 
FMLN: Water Won't Be Privatized In El Salvador

Demonstrators marched towards the Legislative Assembly where they intended to have their demands heard by a commission of deputies of the different political factions.

A group of union workers joined ranks with the students on Alameda Roosevelt Ave., in the vicinity of Parque Cuscatlán, to protest attempts to privatize water.

Another rally was organized by a group of war veterans in the Divine Savior of the World Square. They marched to the Legislative Assembly to demand the fulfillment of their rights obtained through the Peace Accords.

Salvadorans have been taking to the streets for the past month demanding that water stays in the hands of the people, not private businesses.

In early June, just a month after the conservative majority legislator (2018-2022) went into session; lawmakers began to approve measures within the right-wing ARENA (Nationalist Republican Alliance) “Comprehensive Water Law” that would privatize water.

However, many are demanding that legislators not privatize water and approve the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front's (FMLN) “General Water Law.” The FMLN bill initially put forth in 2006, would define and protect water as a human right, ensure its universal access, and calls for the country's water management oversight committee to consist of state institutions, not corporations.


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