• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • Ecuador has bolstered border security with Colombia in recent weeks following a series of fatal attacks.

    Ecuador has bolstered border security with Colombia in recent weeks following a series of fatal attacks. | Photo: Reuters

Published 12 May 2018

The decision would be the latest in Ecuador's recent saga of bolstered militarism and security measures along its border with Colombia.
 

Ecuador's government is seeking to open a headquarters of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in the capital city of Quito, according to Foreign Minister Maria Fernanda Espinosa.

RELATED:
Ecuador Solidifies Border Security Plan, Bolsters Troops

The headquarters would be the seventh such office in Latin America, intended to strengthen security and anti-crime cooperation.

The Ecuadorean diplomat held a meeting to evaluate the possibility of a Quito headquarters with the regional representative of UNODC, who was supportive of the plan.

The decision would be the latest in Ecuador's recent saga of bolstered militarism and security measures along its border with Colombia. The country recently deployed extra troops and police to the Esmeraldas region after declaring a state of emergency.

New defense and interior ministers were also appointed to help implement the measures.

RELATED:
Ecuador Declares State of Emergency on Border, Boosts Security

In addition to heavier militarization, the plan also includes bolstering various social programs in order to "create economic incentives for commercial and productive activity," according to the Ministry of Defense.

In the past few months, there have been several attacks against Ecuadorean security forces in the region, as well as the kidnap and murder of three staff from local newspaper El Comercio.

The response by the government has been controversial, particularly after it decided to meet with U.S. officials to "cooperate" on security.

Some voices in media and politics have even called for a return of the U.S. military base in Manta, which shut down after former President Rafael Correa declined to renew its contract.


Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.