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  • The Foreign Ministry described allegations that Ecuador is denying Assange his rights by blocking his internet and phone access as "unacceptable" and "false."

    The Foreign Ministry described allegations that Ecuador is denying Assange his rights by blocking his internet and phone access as "unacceptable" and "false." | Photo: Cancilleria del Ecuador

Published 31 March 2018

The Foreign Ministry described allegations that Ecuador is denying Assange his rights by blocking his internet and phone access as "unacceptable" and "false."

Ecuador has refuted claims it's impinging on the rights of WikiLeaks founder and social activist Julian Assange, insisting that the government is acting in the strictest adherence to international law

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In a statement released Saturday, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs described allegations that Ecuador is denying Assange his rights by blocking his internet and phone access and denying him visitors as "unacceptable" and "false."

"The government considers unacceptable false claims that are spreading irresponsibly through social networks, which hide the background to this situation and deny the existence of documents on Assange's commitment... not to comment publicly on the internal affairs of other states," the statement reads.

"Ecuador confirms categorically that Mr. Assange, in response to the international protection maintained by Ecuador, undertook freely and voluntarily to 'not interfere in the internal affairs of states, to respect the laws of the state that protects him and... defend the interests of Ecuador as the best citizen would do."

The Ecuadorean government restricted Assange's access to communications on March 28 after he breached an agreement not to publicly discuss the domestic affairs of other nations.

Using social media, Assange had criticized Germany's decision to arrest Catalan pro-independence leader Carles Puigdemont on behalf of the Spanish government. 

He also offered to testify in the Cambridge Analytica case, after evidence surfaced about the firm's involvement in Donald Trump's presidential campaign and the U.K.'s Brexit referendum.

He then attacked Americas Minister Alan Duncan, who had called Assange a "miserable little worm" who should walk out of the embassy and give himself up to British justice.


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