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  • Anayansi Rodríguez Camejo, Cuba’s Permanent Representative to the UN, at the 72nd General Assembly’s Committee for the Advancement of Women, October 5, 2017.

    Anayansi Rodríguez Camejo, Cuba’s Permanent Representative to the UN, at the 72nd General Assembly’s Committee for the Advancement of Women, October 5, 2017. | Photo: U.N.

Worldwide statistics show women earn on average 60 to 75 percent of mens' salaries for the same or equal work.

Anayansi Rodriguez Camejo, Cuba’s Permanent Representative to the United Nations, addressed the 72nd General Assembly’s Committee for the Advancement of Women, highlighting how Cuba has excelled at creating a nearly gender equal society.

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Camejo says that the nation met the U.N. Millennium Development Goals and is implementing the Sustainable Development Goals set for countries to achieve by 2030.

She told the committee that Cuban women and women have equal access to public spheres. She added that women create 57.3 percent of the country’s economic activity, representing 48 percent of all public sector employees, and 47.2 percent of senior management.

Worldwide statistics show women earn on average 60 to 75 percent of mens' salaries for the same or equal work.

Women in Cuba, she noted, have equal access to the nation’s free education. They are guaranteed extensive sexual and reproductive rights, including access to free and safe abortions and paid post-pregnancy leave for up to a year, under Cuba’s universal health care system.

These accomplishments have been made despite the almost 60 year U.S. government blockade on Cuba.

Camejo told the committee that in order to reach full elimination of “violence against women and girls” it is necessary that “the economic, commercial and financial blockade imposed by the United States against Cuba” be removed.

She said the blockade impedes the “full development of the country and the advancement of women; it is also a form of direct and indirect violence affecting and hampering Cuban women’s enjoyment of fundamental rights, including their right to development.”


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