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Costa Rica Prepares Second Round of Elections

Thirteen presidential hopefuls vying for Costa Rica's top post have been reduced to two, as the country heads to a second round of elections on April 1.

Ultra-conservative Evangelical candidate Fabricio Alvarado Munoz, who finished on top of the pack in the first round with 24 percent of the votes, is set to face center-left Carlos Alvarado Quesada in the runoff.

Pressing social and political issues await the newly elected president, including the need to create more jobs, improve public health, reduce crime and boost the economy.

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  • Supporters of Fabricio Alvarado, presidential candidate of the National Restoration party (PRN), cheer during the last debate for Costa Rica

    Supporters of Fabricio Alvarado, presidential candidate of the National Restoration party (PRN), cheer during the last debate for Costa Rica's 2018 presidential election in San Jose, Costa Rica February 1, 2018. | Photo Reuters

  • Supporters of Antonio Alvarez Desanti, presidential candidate of the National Liberation Party, (PLN), cheer during the last debate for Costa

    Supporters of Antonio Alvarez Desanti, presidential candidate of the National Liberation Party, (PLN), cheer during the last debate for Costa's Rica 2018 presidential election in San Jose, Costa Rica February 1, 2018. | Photo Reuters

  • Antonio Alvarez Desanti, of the National Liberation Party, (PLN), speaks next to Carlos Alvarado, of the ruling Citizens

    Antonio Alvarez Desanti, of the National Liberation Party, (PLN), speaks next to Carlos Alvarado, of the ruling Citizens' Action Party (PAC), during the last debate for the Costa Rica 2018 presidential election in San Jose, Costa Rica February 1, 2018. | Photo Reuters

  • Rodolfo Piza of the Social Christian Unity Party (PUSC), gestures to the aundience next to Juan Diego Castro of the National Integration Party (PIN) before of the last debate for the Costa Rica 2018 presidential election in San Jose, Costa Rica, February 1, 2018.

    Rodolfo Piza of the Social Christian Unity Party (PUSC), gestures to the aundience next to Juan Diego Castro of the National Integration Party (PIN) before of the last debate for the Costa Rica 2018 presidential election in San Jose, Costa Rica, February 1, 2018. | Photo Reuters

  • Candidates participate in the last debate for Costa Rica

    Candidates participate in the last debate for Costa Rica's 2018 presidential election in San Jose, Costa Rica February 1, 2018. | Photo Reuters

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