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  • Popular protests against corruption have intensified in recent weeks in Brazil.

    Popular protests against corruption have intensified in recent weeks in Brazil. | Photo: Reuters

Brazil's Popular Front, which gathers social movements, political parties and trade unions, outlined 10 proposals in Sao Paulo Monday.

Social and political movements in Brazil are organizing a “popular emergency plan” meant to strengthen a society rooted in "democracy and well-being," in case an interim government should replace the unelected Michel Temer administration as a consequence of the scandals he is facing.

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Brazil's Popular Front, which gathers social movements, political parties and trade unions, outlined 10 proposals in Sao Paulo Monday for a model of a sovereign and independent economy based on the workers.

The document also suggests that the national congress should convoke a constituent assembly in order to change the electoral law ahead of the 2018 general elections.

The idea would be for instance to impose a certain proportion of Black or women lawmakers, reflecting the proportion of each minority in each electoral district, so lawmakers would represent Brazilian society better, said Joao Pedro Stedile, one of the national coordinator of the Landless Workers Movement.

Currently, 80 percent of lawmakers are businessmen, and the 20 percent left were supported by lawmakers so they could be elected, added Stedile according to Agencia Brasil.

The emergency plan was introduced amid a scandal involving Temer and his controversial relationship with businessman Joesley Batista, which could put an end to his senate-imposed rule.

In a wiretap discussion with Temer, Batista, president of Brazil's largest meatpacking company, JBS, had openly discussed paying bribes to Brazil's former speaker of the lower house of representatives, Eduardo Cunha.

The bribes were intended to keep Cunha silent about embarrassing secrets that could jeopardize the legitimacy of Temer's presidency. In the leaked wiretap, Temer is heard telling Batista, “Look, you've got to keep that up,” referring to the bribes.

Stedile added that the only reason Temer had not been impeached yet was because the ruling elites had not agreed yet on who would replace him.

In his opinion, the solution to the current political crisis does not lie in having congress choose Temer's successor, but in free, direct elections, as the majority of Brazilians have been demanding.


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