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  • Children are pictured near dwellings known as "palafitas" in Recife, Brazil.

    Children are pictured near dwellings known as "palafitas" in Recife, Brazil. | Photo: Reuters

“The data is clear in showing a decline in income inequality during the period between 2002 and 2015,” said former minister Tereza Campello.

Brazil experienced an “unprecedented and systematic decline in inequality in recent years, however, the country continues to be ranked as one of the most unequal countries in the world.” The affirmation, comprised by Tereza Campello, the former Minister of Social Development and Fight Against Hunger, was published as part of a report titled “Faces of Inequality in Brazil: A Look At Those Who Are Left Behind.”

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The report was released as part of The Challenge of Inequality in Brazil and Latin America International Conference, which commenced on Monday and comes to a close today in the city of Rio de Janeiro.

The study, according to Revista Forum, presents data obtained from research conducted by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics between 2002 and 2015, which shows a sharp decline in Brazil's inequality gap.

Data from the report shows that there was a 242 percent increase among 20 percent of the poorest mothers and fathers who completed basic education.

While infant mortality declined by 45 percent, basic medical care increased for the entire populace increased by 64 percent.

Income for the poorest 20 percent increased four times faster than that of the richest. Also, Black students entering university jumped from roughly 400,000 to some 1,600,000, an increase of 268 percent.

Ultimately, chronic poverty, which afflicted 9.3 percent of Brazil's populace in 2002 had been reduced to one percent in 2015, that being despite the international crises adversely affecting the country.

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“The data is clear in showing a decline in income inequality during the period between 2002 and 2015,” Campello confirmed along with her colleague, Pablo Gentili, a professor at Rio de Janeiro State University. They went on to affirm that such a decrease “had never occurred in Brazilian history.”

“Press coverage insists on delivering a biased reading” of the data, they claimed, adding that the aim is to “disqualify the process of inclusion and reduction in social injustice during the recent period in which Brazil was governed by progressive forces.”


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