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  • A picture taken on October 9, 2014 in the Bosnian capital Sarajevo shows campaign posters hanging in a street ahead of Sunday

    A picture taken on October 9, 2014 in the Bosnian capital Sarajevo shows campaign posters hanging in a street ahead of Sunday's general election (Photo: AFP)

"I wish there'd be some radical change ... across the country, but I doubt it, because people here still vote according to national patterns," said economist Miroslav Dardarevic, voting in the Serb Republic main city of Banja Luka.

Bosnians disatisified with high unemployment and widespread corruption headed to the polls Sunday to vote in elections that many people believe will do little to change the direction of the country.

"I didn't vote for anyone; they're all the same. I just came to cast an empty ballot so they can't misuse it," said Sarajevo pensioner Saima Alajbegovic.

The country, 20 years removed from a three-year (1992-1995) war between the nation's Croats, Muslims and Serbs that killed 100,000 people, is still largely divided along ethnic lines and suffers from weak governance. As part of the Dayton Accords which ended the conflict, the country is divided into two autonomous regions — the Serb Republic (Republika Srpska) and the Muslim-Croat Federation — united by a central government which has historically been ineffective and largely unable to reach decisions.

"Nothing functions in this country," Mirsada Grgo, a 64-year-old pensioner from Sarajevo, told AFP.

In February mass protests broke out across the country as a result of widepread dissatisfaction with the country's political and economic situation.

More than 3 million people will vote will vote for 518 national, regional and local government posts. Bosnia, one of the poorest countries in Europe, has an unemployment rate of 44 percent.

Bosnia is also seeking European Union membership. The E.U. issued a statement Friday saying that it expected the new government to "bring much needed reconciliation in society and politics... and close the gap with the rest of the region and ensure progress towards the E.U."

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