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  • Bolivian President Evo Morales with a poster of Argentine communist revolutionary Che Guevara in the background.

    Bolivian President Evo Morales with a poster of Argentine communist revolutionary Che Guevara in the background. | Photo: Reuters

The events currently taking place in memory of Che in Bolivia are indicative of the country’s changes under Morales, said Cuban historian Froilan Gonzales.

As Bolivia celebrates the late Ernesto “Che” Guevara’s life and legacy 50 years after his murder, activists at the worldwide gathering are highlighting similarities between the revolutionary and the Bolivian president Evo Morales.

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Bolivia Begins Tribute to Che on 50th Anniversary of Death

Marianela Prada, of Che's five decades old Committee in Bolivia, said the similarities between the two include their personal ideals, the history of their volunteer work, as well as their political training.

"There are many similarities,” she said. “To begin with there is (their) deep humanism … Che said that it is revolutionary to give love.”

“If you do not have a sensitivity to injustice it is impossible for you to dream of change through revolution," she added.

The Cuban historian and author of "The Murder of Che in Bolivia," Froilan Gonzales, also compared the two leaders, saying that the numerous forums, debates, artistic and musical exhibitions currently taking place in memory of Che in Bolivia are indicative of the country’s changes under Morales.

"Now it is an official tribute from the government, the people-centered government … that seems to me a transcendent fact," he said.

"Honoring the legacy of Ernesto 'Che' Guevara, we call to celebrate his fight from the 5 to the 9 of October in Vallegrande, Santa Cruz, Bolivia."

From October 5 to 9 in Vallegrande, where Che's body was buried after his capture and murder by the Bolivian state in 1967, the country is highlighting his revolutionary accomplishments with a host of activities ahead of the anniversary of his death on October 9.

"It's not a time to cry for Che,” Morales posted on his official Twitter account. “It's a time for strength, to deepen the anti-imperialist struggle, Che is part of that, in the face of military dictatorships a group of brave armed people rose to enforce sovereignty."

Che helped create the Nancahuazu Guerrilla, also known as the National Liberation Army in Bolivia and led them to their first victory in the town of Camiri. The guerilla movement successfully ambushed the Bolivian Army but was eventually routed by U.S.-backed forces.

In September, the Bolivian government also added to his leagacy by launching a website on the history and writings of Che.

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