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  • A journalist (L) holds a framed picture of slain photojournalist Daniel Esqueda next to Juan Manuel Carreras (C), governor of San Luis Potosi state, during a meeting with journalists at the Municipal Palace in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, October 6, 2017.

    A journalist (L) holds a framed picture of slain photojournalist Daniel Esqueda next to Juan Manuel Carreras (C), governor of San Luis Potosi state, during a meeting with journalists at the Municipal Palace in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, October 6, 2017. | Photo: Reuters

Edgar Esqueda was abducted from his home and his remains were discovered near San Luis Potosi airport. 

The body of the kidnapped Mexican photojournalist, Edgar Daniel Esqueda Castro, has been found in the city of San Luis Potosi in Central Mexico.

His death brings the total number of reporters killed in the country since the start of the year to 12.

Reports say Esqueda's body showed signs of torture and gunshot wounds.

His wife told the Committee to Protect Journalists that armed men in police uniform, who identified themselves as local officers, abducted him from their home in San Luis Potosi on Thursday.

The state attorney general’s office tweeted a statement saying its officers were not involved.

Esqueda was a reporter and photographer covering police and crime for Vox Populi San Luis Potosi and Metropoli San Luis Potosi. 

He had been threatened twice by local officers while covering news events.

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In one instance, five policemen threatened to beat up him and take his camera if he continued to photograph a murder scene, making him erase the pictures and leave the site. The following week an officer confronted Esqueda at a different event, taking pictures of his i.d. and advising him to watch himself and his home.

Esqueda reported the incidents to the San Luis Potosi Human Rights Commission, SLPHRC, which then forwarded the complaints to Mexico’s National Human Rights Commission, NHRC.

The NHRC confirmed the reports directly with Esqueda who said he hadn’t received further police intimidation and did not file a formal complaint at the national level. 

By July, according to CBS News, the SLPHRC said it turned over the case to the San Luis Potosi prosecutor's office. 

After he was abducted, the CPJ, released a statement on its website calling for the local authorities and the government to, “find Edgar Daniel Esqueda Castro as swiftly as possible.”

The statement added that, "Mexico is one of the most dangerous countries in the world for journalists. If the Mexican government is as committed to press freedom as they claim to be, they must prevent future kidnappings and killings."

The CPJ said it is currently investigating the disappearances of 13 other journalists.

In 2016 the International Human Rights Commission reported that Mexico was the most dangerous nation in Latin American for reporters, whose deaths and disappearances go nearly 100 percent unsolved and unconvicted. 

Almost 100 people, mainly reporters, gathered in front of the San Luis Potosi government building on Friday for a minutes silence to mark Esqueda's murder.

They held signs that read, “no more, enough already” and, “Am I next?”

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