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  • Another daughter of Berta Caceres, Olivia Zuñiga, speaks during a protest to demand justice for her mother in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, March 17, 2016.

    Another daughter of Berta Caceres, Olivia Zuñiga, speaks during a protest to demand justice for her mother in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, March 17, 2016. | Photo: Reuters

"We feel completely defenseless, we feel that we could also be assassinated at any time," she said.

In an exclusive live interview with teleSUR, Olivia Zuniga Caceres, oldest daughter of prominent human rights activist Berta Caceres, accused the Honduran state of being responsible of her mother's death and failing to protect her and her sisters adequately.

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"The government of Honduras first tried to make the political crime into something else, the Security Minister first said it was a crime of passion, for instance, and the crime scene was manipulated. We believe that the state was aware of the assassination plan, did not do anything to avoid the murder, and even planned it," she said.

"Why did she receive the so-called 'protection of the state', but was still murdered?" she wondered, explaining that she did not trust security forces to protect her and her sisters. "So we feel completely defenseless, we feel that we could also be assassinated at any time." She discussed preventative measures with the government, but was still awaiting an answer from President Juan Orlando Hernandez.

She complained that her family has been completely excluded from the investigative process; meanwhile, not even one suspect has been arrested in the case of her mother's death. One day after the murder, another Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras leader was assassinated in Santa Barbara, she recalled, pointing to the total impunity reigning in the country.

"We have no access to justice, there is a strong collusion between drug traffickers and state officials, and the criminalization of social leaders is institutionalized," she added.

She also demanded the cancellation of extraction projects, relaying her mother's struggle, recalling that Honduras' neoliberal government had given away 30 percent of national territory – mainly located on Indigenous land – to multinational firms, which are dramatically looting the people's resources.


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