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  • Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Bernie Sanders speaks at the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 7, 2016.

    Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Bernie Sanders speaks at the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 7, 2016. | Photo: Reuters

If Clinton fails to reach a majority of pledged delegates, the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia this summer will be a contested one.

Bernie Sanders’ campaign manager Jeff Weaver said in an interview with ABC that if Clinton fails to reach a majority of pledged delegates ahead of the Democratic convention, Sanders will “100 percent, absolutely” challenge her for the nomination.

“The way the math is right now, it is very, very, very unlikely that either candidate will arrive at the convention with enough pledged delegates to win the nomination,” Weaver added. 

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At least 2,383 delegates are needed to win the Democratic primary. Clinton currently has 1,742 total delegates, 1,259 who are pledged and 483 super delegates. Sanders currently has 1,051 total delegates, 1,020 pledged and 31 superdelegates, but superdelgates could change their minds at the convention.

“A lot of these superdelegates may rethink their position with Hillary Clinton,” Sanders told CNN in late March. “I think their own constituents are going to say to them, hey, why don’t you support the people of our state, vote for Sanders?”

Weaver said the strength that Sanders has shown among independent voters should make superdelegates “nervous” about the Democratic frontrunner. This is why Weaver believes that Sanders will emerge as the winner and not Hillary Clinton. 

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The Vermont senator’s campaign was boosted recently by landslide victories in Alaska, Washington, Hawaii and most recently in Wisconsin. Now he is hoping to upset  Clinton New York on April 19, the state where she served as a senator.

However, the math still favors the former secretary of state, who can clinch a first-ballot nomination by winning about one-third of the delegates available in the remaining five caucuses and 16 primaries through June 7.

 


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