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  • Venezuelan Foreign Minister Delcy Rodriguez at the OAS General Assembly

    Venezuelan Foreign Minister Delcy Rodriguez at the OAS General Assembly | Photo: EFE

"I think the only way (the U.S.) can impose their will is with their Marines, who would be met with a swift response in Venezuela," Foreign Minister Delcy Rodriguez said.

The Organization of American States' annual meeting resumed today with more maneuvers by the U.S., Canada and right-wing Latin American countries to intervene in Venezuela's internal affairs.

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After interventionist attempts failed just a day earlier during the OAS's consultation meeting on Venezuela, today's general assembly saw Canada leading the charge against the Venezuelan government. The aim: to shore up support within the organization to demand the annulment of Venezuela's Constituent Assembly, to call for the release of so-called "political prisoners," and a host of other internal measures that would amount to a virtual foreign intervention.

Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland — who was widely criticized in March for admitting she’s “proud” of her family’s Nazi past — expressed “concern” over Venezuela. Last month, in a statement she said, “Canada is troubled” by Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s call for a National Constituent Assembly — a call supported by many social movements, made to ease political turmoil and promote democratic dialogue.

In response, Venezuela's Foreign Minister Delcy Rodriguez reiterated that the country's constituent assembly is “fully authorized in the Constitution,” adding that those who oppose this democratic feature “don't acknowledge Venezuela's political diversity,” leaning more toward an agenda of violent conflict.

Rodriguez emphasized that the United States is the main advocate for intervention in Venezuela for it wishing to put an end to the country's model of social inclusion, solidarity, and appropriate the nation's huge oil and gas reserves.

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"I think the only way (the U.S.) can impose their will is with their Marines, who would be met with a swift response in Venezuela," she said.

She added that U.S. President Donald Trump, despite being the leader of a nation that emits the largest amount of greenhouse gases, withdrew from the Paris Climate Accord. “Many Caribbean countries suffer from the irresponsibility and (political) model of the United States which compromises life on the planet.”

Alluding to Venezuela's withdrawal process from the OAS, Rodriguez said that Venezuela would never again seek membership in an organization subverted by the hegemonic power of the United States.

During her trip to Mexico, Rodriguez met with family members of the missing 43 Ayotzinapa students, urging the Mexican government to investigate the case more thoroughly.

"# Now | Chancellor Rodriguez spoke with relatives of the missing 43 Ayotzinapa (students)."

Venezuela also put forth 10 proposals for the general assembly to consider, including putting an end to Trump's insistence on building a wall along the Mexican-U.S. border.

Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland — who was widely criticized in March for admitting she’s “proud” of her family’s Nazi past — expressed “concern” over Venezuela. She insisted that values considered to be vital to the Canadian government, democracy and equality, are systematically “violated in Venezuela.”

Last month, she released a statement saying “Canada is troubled” by Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s call for a National Constituent Assembly — a call, supported by many social movements, made to ease political turmoil and promote democratic dialogue.


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