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  • Media workers protest in Plaza de Mayo in defense of the Media Law, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Dec. 30, 2015.

    Media workers protest in Plaza de Mayo in defense of the Media Law, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Dec. 30, 2015. | Photo: teleSUR

Protesters say conservative President Mauricio Macri tries to censor them from showing the reality in the country. 

Dozens of workers of community and alternative media outlets in Argentina have taken to the streets of Buenos Aires on Saturday to demand the payment of government funded promotion programs for nonprofit media, which is mandated in the country's media law. 

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Protesters say these payments have been delayed since conservative President Mauricio Macri took office in December and made changes in the media legislation, a move they say is an attempt to block them from showing the reality in the country. 

They have tried to hold meetings with the Ministry of Communications in order to present their demands, but they had no answers to their requests.

Marci gutted the country's media law through a decree that absorbed two regulatory agencies into a new entity known as the National Agency of Telecommunications, thus toppling the 2009 media law that sought democratization of media outlets by ordering the breakup of media monopolies.

The law was fiercely contested by Argentina's largest media conglomerate, the Clarin Group, whose owners were also declared opponents of the left-wing governments of Nestor Kirchner and Cristina Fernandez.

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Analysts in Argentina claim that corporate media have played a part in this new historic period of growing inequality in the South American country and public media workers have called for ongoing mobilizations to defend the law.

Macri’s regime has been marked by nationwide protests over the mass layoffs and also for the repression experienced by opponents to his government, like Indigenous activist Milagro Sala and her husband Raul Noro, who have been called the first political prisoners of Macri's government.

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