• Live
    • Audio Only
  • google plus
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • President Mauricio Macri requested IMF support in May, a decision met with protests by broad sectors of the population.

    President Mauricio Macri requested IMF support in May, a decision met with protests by broad sectors of the population. | Photo: Reuters

Published 7 June 2018

The International Monetary Fund has not operated in Argentina since former President Nestor Kirchner was still in power.

Argentina and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) have agreed on a 36-month loan totalling US$50 billion, following weeks of protests by Argentine citizens rejecting IMF activity in the country.

RELATED:
Argentina: IMF Endorses Macri’s Economic Programme as Citizens Protest

IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde said in a statement that she "congratulates" the Argentine authorities on the agreement.

"This is a plan owned and designed by the Argentine government; one aimed at strengthening the economy," Lagarde said.

Argentina's President Mauricio Macri requested IMF support in May, a decision that was quickly met with protests by broad sectors of the population.

The IMF had previously been active in Argentina, forcing harsh austerity measures and pushing the country into recession with an unpayable debt.

After the country defaulted, resulting in millions of people losing their jobs, former President Nestor Kirchner vowed that no further IMF loans would ever be taken.

The right-wing Macri, however, began slashing public sector investment and returned to a neoliberal free-market policy. The result has been skyrocketing inflation, reaching 25 percent so far, and rising prices of public goods.


Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.