• Live
    • Audio Only
  • Share on Google +
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on twitter
  • Glynn Manley and Winsome Hudson sign the Deposit Agreement that formalizes the handover of the Manley tapes to the National Library.

    Glynn Manley and Winsome Hudson sign the Deposit Agreement that formalizes the handover of the Manley tapes to the National Library. | Photo: Twitter/ @natlibja

teleSUR
Newsletter
Get our newsletter delivered directly to your inbox

His taped reflections are said to be frank and had been embargoed by his publishers.

Jamaica's late Prime Minister Michael Manley will be heard once again as conversations recorded with his wife Glynn for his memoirs are released.

RELATED:
'I Have Endured It All': Former Jamaican PM Bids Farewell

The tapes had been embargoed to protect other public figures from Manley's uncompromising statements.

On Thursday, the National Library of Jamaica received the raw, unedited conversations from Manley's widow.

She features on the cassette tapes as his interviewer.

Some of the contents will be included in a new book, "In My Own Voice: Michael Manley in Conversation" by Ian Randle Publishers.

It will be edited by Professor Anthony Bogues, of Brown University.

Speaking on the editor's behalf, the managing director of Ian Randle Publishers, Christine Randle, explained why the embargo was necessary.

"Mr Manley was quite frank in his reflections, and as such, it was deemed necessary by all of us involved that an embargo had to be put on the material becoming public."

RELATED:
Jamaican Women's Group Slams Churches on Marital Rape Position

She added, "The public won't be able to listen to the full uncut, unedited version for 20 years. Some of the material, some of the statements are sensitive or could be considered sensitive to persons, perhaps, who are still in public life. There is nothing libellous or defamatory, but taking into consideration all sensibilities and persons' reputations and you know how politics run in Jamaica, right?"

The need for an embargo was emphasized by Winsome Hudson, the outgoing national librarian.

She says the conversations would not be available under Jamaica's Access to Information Act because Manley was a private citizen when they were recorded.

Michael Manley was prime minister of Jamaica from 1972-1980, and again from 1989-1992, when he retired from public life.

The recorded conversations were the brainchild of his wife Glynn, who realized that her husband was too ill to write his autobiography as planned.

Using a cassette would still give him autonomy over the crafting of his legacy.

He died in 1997 from prostate cancer.

|

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.