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The Coup That Ousted Brazilian Democracy

Brazil's legislative coup has now definitively toppled twice-elected President Dilma Rousseff. The corruption-ridden neoliberal coup government will no doubt set its sites on targeting the social programs  created and expanded in the last 13 years under the governments of the Workers' Party, or PT, while doing everything in its power to serve the wealthy elites. However, the Temer administration will have to contend with social movements who don't plan to back down from confronting the forces behind those who've seized power in South America's most populous nation.

If You Only Watch One Thing...

 

Brazil Resists

 
Supporters of Brazil's suspended President Dilma Rousseff, show a banner that reads

Democracy Is Dead in Brazil

The successful execution of this coup, which masqueraded as a legitimate impeachment trial, sets a dangerous precedent for Latin America. READ MORE

Brazil Coup and Political Crisis: How Did We Get Here?

Brazil's political crisis dates back to 2014 when Rousseff was re-elected as president for the second time in October 2014 amid a recession, with high inflation and unemployment rising in the country. READ MORE

Popular Resistance

 

MST: Social Movements Must Rise up Against Coup Govt in Brazil

Brazilians must be prepared to fight back against the neoliberal assault which the new, illegitmate government has in store for the country. READ MORE

The Brazilian Tragedy

It is worth remembering that capitalism was never interested in democracy: one of its main theorists, Friedrich von Hayek, said that this was a mere "convenience" admissible insofar as it does not interfere with the "free market," the non-negotiable needs of the system. READ MORE

Hypocrisy of the Coup Leaders

 

Majority of Senate That Impeached Rousseff Under Investigation

49 of 81 Brazilian senators who ousted the president for corruption charges are themselves the targets of criminal inquiries. READ MORE

Who Stands to Gain?

 

'It Was a Coup,' Says Brazil's Only LGBT Lawmaker Jean Wyllys

“The new political hegemony in Brazil is conservative, reactionary, and anti-intellectual," says Brazilian lawmaker Jean Wyllys. READ MORE

The Incapacity of the Oligarchy in Brazil

Widespread corruption, conspiratorial politics, and foreign meddling are just some of the characteristics of the coup in Brazil. READ MORE

Racism and the New Oligarchy

 
An anti-government demonstrator and a supporter of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff (R) clash near the Planalto palace in Brasilia, Brazil, March 17, 2016.

Race, Racism, and the Coup Against Dilma

The protests backing the ouster of President Rousseff have been overwhelmingly white, revealing the racial divide of the current political crisis.In a country like Brazil, where race and class are nearly indistinguishable, the weight of their reactionary policies will fall heaviest on the country's predominantly Black and low-income population. READ MORE

Hate Driven Coup: 5 Radical Policies That Irked Brazil's Elite

President Rousseff's re-election in 2014 marked the fourth consecutive victory for the Workers Party, a fact that did not sit well with the country's elites and their right-wing allies, who immediately started to conspire against the president.

But what have the Workers Party (PT) governments done to provoke Brazil’s elites to the point that they are now willing to try to mount a coup to oust Rousseff? READ MORE

The Role of the US

 
People are reflected on the glass as a board showing the Real-U.S. dollar and several foreign currencies exchange rates is seen in Rio de Janeiro

US State Department Announces Support for Ousting Rousseff

The U.S. is confident that it will continue its strong bilateral relations with Brazil after the Senate's vote to oust Rousseff, a spokesperson said. READ MORE

How the Pro-Coup US Is Undermining Brazil's Democracy

The U.S. has been actively supportive of the interim government, with many of its Cabinet members already close to the U.S., according to WikiLeaks documents. The United States has been essential in legitimizing Brazil’s impeachment process—widely described by others as a soft coup—and has played a hand in propping up the interim government. READ MORE

Infographics on the Brazil Coup

 

Brazil's Coup Government an All-White, All-Male Affair

 

Coup by the Numbers

 

The Role of Brazil's Private Media

 

Achievements of the PT Governments

 
 
  • Suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff waves to supporters after the Senate voted to suspend, Brasilia, May 12, 2016.

    Suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff waves to supporters after the Senate voted to suspend, Brasilia, May 12, 2016. | Photo Reuters

  • The congressional decision to continue with the devious impeachment process against President Dilma Rousseff has been rejected internationally.

    The congressional decision to continue with the devious impeachment process against President Dilma Rousseff has been rejected internationally. | Photo Twitter / ‎@hellodarling

  • In Brasilia, members of the Landless Workers Movement (MST) joined the protest against the impeachment of Rousseff.

    In Brasilia, members of the Landless Workers Movement (MST) joined the protest against the impeachment of Rousseff. | Photo Reuters

  • A woman protests against Brazil

    A woman protests against Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff, calling for her impeachment, at Paulista avenue in Sao Paulo, Brazil, May 11, 2016. | Photo Reuters

  • Demonstrators hold a banner reading "Yes women can!" in a protest against Brazil

    Demonstrators hold a banner reading "Yes women can!" in a protest against Brazil's acting president Michel Temer in Sao Paulo, Brazil on May 15, 2016. | Photo AFP

  • People go down the escalator in front of a phrase and posters with the image Brazil

    People go down the escalator in front of a phrase and posters with the image Brazil's interim President Michel Temer at the entrance of a subway, after the Brazilian Senate voted to impeach President Dilma Rousseff, at Paulista Avenue in Sao Paulo, Brazil, May 12, 2016. The words read: | Photo Reuters

  • Supporters of suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff protest in front of the Planalto Palace aafter the Brazilian Senate voted to impeach of Rousseff for breaking budget laws in Brasilia, Brazil, May 12, 2016.

    Supporters of suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff protest in front of the Planalto Palace aafter the Brazilian Senate voted to impeach of Rousseff for breaking budget laws in Brasilia, Brazil, May 12, 2016. | Photo Reuters

  • Brazilian women protest against the Senate-imposed government of Michel Temer with a sign reading

    Brazilian women protest against the Senate-imposed government of Michel Temer with a sign reading | Photo EFE

  • Demonstrators protest against Brazil

    Demonstrators protest against Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff calling for her impeachment in Sao Paulo, Brazil, May 9, 2016. | Photo Reuters

  • Demonstrators burn a poster with the images of President of the Brazilian Senate Renan Calheiros (L) and Brazil

    Demonstrators burn a poster with the images of President of the Brazilian Senate Renan Calheiros (L) and Brazil's interim President Michel Temer in Sao Paulo, Brazil, May 12, 2016. | Photo Reuters

  • Supporters of suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff protest in front of the Planalto Palace after the Brazilian Senate voted to impeach of Rousseff for breaking budget laws in Brasilia, Brazil, May 12, 2016.

    Supporters of suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff protest in front of the Planalto Palace after the Brazilian Senate voted to impeach of Rousseff for breaking budget laws in Brasilia, Brazil, May 12, 2016. | Photo Reuters

  • People go down the escalator in front of a phrase and posters with the image Brazil

    People go down the escalator in front of a phrase and posters with the image Brazil's interim President Michel Temer at the entrance of a subway, after the Brazilian Senate voted to impeach President Dilma Rousseff, at Paulista Avenue in Sao Paulo, Brazil, May 12, 2016. The words read: | Photo Reuters

  • Policemen ride their horses during a clash with demonstrators at a protest against the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff, in Porto Alegre, Brazil, May 12, 2016.

    Policemen ride their horses during a clash with demonstrators at a protest against the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff, in Porto Alegre, Brazil, May 12, 2016. | Photo Reuters

  • In Brasilia, members of the Landless Workers Movement (MST) joined the protest against the impeachment of Rousseff.

    In Brasilia, members of the Landless Workers Movement (MST) joined the protest against the impeachment of Rousseff. | Photo Reuters

  • Supporters of suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff protest in front of the Planalto Palace after the Brazilian Senate voted to impeach of Rousseff for breaking budget laws in Brasilia, Brazil, May 12, 2016.

    Supporters of suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff protest in front of the Planalto Palace after the Brazilian Senate voted to impeach of Rousseff for breaking budget laws in Brasilia, Brazil, May 12, 2016. | Photo Reuters

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