• Live
    • Audio Only
  • Share on Google +
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on twitter
  • Quito

    Quito's recent earthquakes are the result of a system of fault lines. | Photo: Reuters

Just like Chile, Peru and Colombia, Ecuador is a subduction zone, meaning earthquakes occur inland.

Quito's earthquakes are the result of a system of fault lines which go from the south of Quito to San Antonio de Pichincha—about 37 miles long, explained Alexandra Alvarado, director of the Ecuador Geophysical Institute.

RELATED:
Of Hope and Resilience in Earthquake Hit Ecuador

“Quito's fault line is the rupture on which the city moves,” said Alvarado to El Telegrafo. “Quito's rupture was produced as the Nazca tectonic plate was advancing below the continent, generating a lot of pressure on the continent, resulting in the creation of ruptures like Quito's.”

Just like Chile, Peru and Colombia, Ecuador is a subduction zone, meaning earthquakes occur inland, where big masses of land are interacting between each other, producing these ruptures.

The ruptures are not visible on the surface, but the city of Quito lies on a fault line. An earthquake occurs when these fault lines are displaced, either within the system itself, or when another rupture is created somewhere else.

As Quito is located on the top of the Chillos and Tumbaco valleys, as they rise, Quito rises even higher—about 500 meters higher in a continuous process of about 1 million year.

“We are talking of a 1-million-year continuous process of earthquakes and reliefs,” explained the scientist. “Aftershocks correspond to the time the rocks are accommodating themselves, where the rupture occurred, leaving the area unstable, usually between 5 and 10 kilometers deep, on an inclined plan.”

teleSUR
Newsletter
Get our newsletter delivered directly to your inbox

Tell Us Your Story

Have you got more information on any of our stories? Or have you got an original story to tell? Let us knowHERE

|

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.