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  • A demonstrator holds a placard depicting Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto during a protest against a fuel price hike in Mexico City, Mexico January 9, 2017.

    A demonstrator holds a placard depicting Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto during a protest against a fuel price hike in Mexico City, Mexico January 9, 2017. | Photo: Reuters

Tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets across Mexico in "Gasolinazo" protests and to demand President Enrique Peña Nieto resign.

Mexican citizens, social movements and civil associations, from both the countryside and big cities, have filed an injunction before courts in an effort to reverse the sudden and drastic increase in fuel prices that has sparked mass protests and discontent across Mexico.

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The groups argue that the move by President Enrique Peña Nieto's administration to hike the price of gas by 20 percent was unconstitutional. Federal judges have already set dates for constitutional hearings on the case, one on Jan. 31 and the other on Feb. 13.

Leaders of Barzon — a powerful resistance movement launched by farmers in 1993 to challenge, reject, appropriate and redefine NAFTA — said the complaints may help to reverse the hikes, but also called on people to put their hopes for change into the peaceful protests that have been rocking the country.

Tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets in several cities across Mexico to demand once again the resignation of embattled President Enrique Peña Nieto.

The peaceful demonstrations have been organized by several political and civil organizations through social media, and they counteract a wave of more violent protests and lootings over the past 10 days that have left at least six people dead and 1,000 arrested.

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Mass Protests Against Mexico Gas Price Hikes Continue

Fresh accusations have emerged in recent days from citizens who claim that looting and vandalism have been led by "infiltrated" groups, in what they argue is likely move intended to create chaos in the country and undermine social protest, setting the stage for government forces to target activists as criminals.

The rising cost of living in Latin America's second-largest economy has fueled popular rejection of Peña Nieto, who has become Mexico's most unpopular president in a quarter of a century.

Mounting frustration with Peña Nieto has also been fueled by entrenched government corruption, rising anxiety over economic stagnation and an increase in the murders rate to the highest level seen since the president took office.

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