• Live
    • Audio Only
  • Share on Google +
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on twitter
  • Astronomy enthusiasts were given a treat on Saturday night and in the early hours of Sunday.

    Astronomy enthusiasts were given a treat on Saturday night and in the early hours of Sunday. | Photo: Reuters

teleSUR
Newsletter
Get our newsletter delivered directly to your inbox

The phenomenon is active from mid-July until Aug. 24 but is expected to peak this weekend.

On Sunday, astronomy enthusiasts were treated to the Perseid meteor shower.

RELATED: 
Middle of the World Brightens Up for Festival of Lights

The meteors are small fragments of interplanetary debris and dust that enter the Earth's atmosphere at a high speed which results in them burning up and causing a shooting stream of light.

Stargazers were given a treat on Saturday night and in the early hours of Sunday as the Perseid meteor shower dazzled the sky.

The phenomenon is active from mid-July until Aug. 24, but its peak was expected to be this weekend.

An Isle of Lewis resident told Sky News that he managed to capture two beautiful images. His related that his window of opportunity was short as just a few hours later the stars had been "clouded out."

The meteors were visible from London, which is known to have high levels of light pollution. Photo: Reuters

An astronomer told Sky News: "This is very rare as there is usually a build up, but the shower started with a bang. You could feel the excitement build as many people from across the UK started to see bright meteors and fireballs early on in the evening."

The meteors were visible from London, which is known to have high levels of light pollution.

"Usually in the UK we are either clouded out or suffer the ill effects of the Moon on meteor showers, and they usually end in disappointment," &The astronomer explained. "The Perseids in 2017 have been the opposite: performing as soon as it got dark and giving many their first glimpse of a meteor with ease.

"People were so pleased and excited, the mentions in my Twitter (@VirtualAstro) feed became unreadable due to the sheer volume of tweets coming in from very happy stargazers."

RELATED: 
Corporate 'Fake Art' Profits off Australia's Indigenous Culture​​​​​​​

Robin Scagell, vice president of the Society for Popular Astronomy, added that: "The Perseids can be very bright and often quite spectacular.

"Some meteor showers are slow, but we are moving into the Perseid stream so they are coming at us quite swiftly. You could see none at all for a few minutes and then two or three. You might be lucky or unlucky; that's the way with meteors," Scagell said.

The United States is expected to be an audience to the first solar eclipse in almost a century, which is expected on 21 August.

The general North America is preparing for the once-in-a-century total solar eclipse. Areas of 14 states will witness the spectacle, already dubbed the Great American Eclipse.

|

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.