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  • Families of the missing 43 blame continue to demand justice for their loved ones.

    Families of the missing 43 blame continue to demand justice for their loved ones. | Photo: EFE

A photo exhibition on the disappearance of 43 students in Ayotzinapa has opened at the Museum of Memory and Tolerance in Mexico City.

A new exhibition by Argentine activist Marcelo Brodsky is paying tribute to the 43 Mexican students who disappeared in Ayotzinapa in 2014, a case widely recognized as one of the worst human rights abuses in Mexico’s recent history.

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Featuring images of the international public outcry, the exhibition “Ayotzinapa Visual Action,” which opens Friday at the Museum of Memory and Tolerance in Mexico City, is an attempt to “remember so as to not repeat,” says the artist.  

According to Brodsky, who was exiled during the Argentine dictatorship, the exhibition was going to be presented in August at the Washington meeting of the Organization of American States but was cancelled following “pressure” from Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto.

The exhibition comes as the parents of the 43 missing students continue to criticize the Mexican government for failing to unveil the true circumstances of their children's disappearance — three years after they went missing.

The Mexican government has insisted on blaming drug lords and local police for the disappearances despite mounting evidence of state collusion.

The exhibition is an effort to demand justice for the 43 students and the countless other victims of violence in Mexico.

“Without justice, there will be more deaths and disappearances,” Brodsky told local media.

“Ayotzinapa Visual Action” will be open at the Museum of Memory and Tolerance until August 16.

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