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  • Senate-imposed president of Brazil Michel Temer.

    Senate-imposed president of Brazil Michel Temer. | Photo: Reuters

"The court not only issued the censorship order but imposed a fine of US$15,000 per day in the event of noncompliance,” according to the Intercept.

Brazil's main newspapers, Folha de S.Paulo and O Globo, were both ordered Monday to delete a report “about a matter of great public interest,” reported the Intercept, reproducing the censored articles online.

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On Friday, Folha released a report showing some WhatsApp messages sent by a hacker to President Michel Temer's wife in April, trying to blackmail her with the information found on her cellphone, before being sentenced to almost six years in prison.

The hacker reportedly warned that the information, if disclosed, would “drag (Temer's) name through the mud” — as they would show that he has engaged in unethical and perhaps even illegal conduct.

According to The Intercept, “both President Temer and his wife deny that the hacked material reveals any wrongdoing. But on Friday, 11 minutes after Folha published its article, the president dispatched his lawyers to request, in the name of his wife, a judicial order requiring the newspapers to remove their reports and refrain from publishing any future materials about the contents of these conversations."

"The court not only issued the censorship order but imposed a fine of US$15,000 per day in the event of noncompliance.” Fohla and O Globo both deleted the article, replacing it with the court order instead.

However, The Intercept added that the information they revealed was not so sensitive and was accessible to “any lawyer, or anyone else who subscribes to the court’s website.”

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