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Bolivia And Chile Contest Water Rights at Silala Spring Along Border

Bolivia's President Evo Morales says he will take another case over a water dispute against neighboring Chile to the International Court of Justice. Bolivia says it owns the Silala spring waters originating in its southwest department of Potosi and that it is not being compensated for Chile's use of the water, which flows across their shared border. Chile argues that the waters constitute an international river and the waters must be shared.

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President Evo Morales inspects the waters of Silala near the border.
President Evo Morales inspects the waters of Silala near the border. Photo:Freddy Morales
Bolivia has accused Chile of stealing its water from Silala via artifical channels.
Bolivia has accused Chile of stealing its water from Silala via artifical channels. Photo:Freddy Morales
Chile argues that Silala is an international waterway that must be shared between both countries.
Chile argues that Silala is an international waterway that must be shared between both countries. Photo:Freddy Morales
Bolivia says the water from Silala rises in its territory and is diverted illegally by Chile.
Bolivia says the water from Silala rises in its territory and is diverted illegally by Chile. Photo:Freddy Morales
President Evo Morales says he is prepared to sue Chile at the International Court of Justice.
President Evo Morales says he is prepared to sue Chile at the International Court of Justice. Photo:Freddy Morales
Chile says it will countersue Bolivia if it takes legal action at the ICJ in the Hague.
Chile says it will countersue Bolivia if it takes legal action at the ICJ in the Hague. Photo:Freddy Morales
Chile uses water from the spring for its mining operations in the Atacama desert.
Chile uses water from the spring for its mining operations in the Atacama desert. Photo:Freddy Morales
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